Finding free classical music is easy 1. ... Then these recordings are converted to digital files, some of these files are make accessible for free to the public. Download thousands of royalty free music files in mp3 without restrictions. Any person or company that has invested time and money in making their own versions/recordings of classical music tracks, even if the composition itself is in the public domain, own the rights to that recording. Give them some class and something they’ll enjoy listening to! According to the site, “the filename is, in most cases, the exact text content of the sample.” The “indivual files” links allow you to download a zip file containing the individual phrases. A year-old Kickstarter project to release a public domain score and studio recording of J.S. Any person or company that has invested time and money in making their own versions/recordings of classical music tracks, even if the composition itself is in the public domain, own the rights to that recording. LibriVox takes texts already in the public domain in the US, asks volunteers to make audio recordings of that text, and then releases the resulting audio back into the public domain. Books, poems and works of art can be used for educational purposes, and poems can be, say, set to music… Using what you find: The recordings are in the public domain. Or not like Fuzzy Math, depending on how you feel about Dubya. Originally released on Edison Diamond Disc, (a format which pre-dated even the 78 RMP record!) New to classical music? Search tips. Using what you find: You might think audio recordings of arguments before the Supreme Court would be in the public domain, and you’d be right. Bach's Goldberg Variations has finally wrapped up, and the copyright-free files are now available online * legal information is not legal advice *, Library of Congress | American Memory collection, The George W. Bush Public Domain Audio Archive. Really. //--> limited. Browsing around in their online catalogue, I found this recording on the Nutcracker Suite. ... Only recordings everyone can play. Many of the recordings are modern performances which have been released to the public domain. In the EU and Canada, a recording of a Stravinsky (died 1971) work which was released in 1930 is not in the public domain because the music contained therein in not yet public domain. I’ll let them tell you. There’s a mix of spoken word and music recordings — you can hear person-on-the-street interviews made just after the attack on Pearl Harbor, as well as recations to the September 11 attacks. Check the list. Listen for free to this hand-curated list of public domain classics. You can find more of Jon Sayles beautiful Classical Guitar Songs here Using what you find: Many of the sound recordings in these collections don’t have copyright restrictions on them, but some certainly do. It was the holiday season, December 17, to be exact, in 1936, when this magnificent performance of Mozart’s “Eine kleine Nachtmusik” was recorded by The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. Heh. You need to read the fine print, however. The professional record cleaning machine Keith Monks 'Archivist Duo Omni' - RCM Mk.IX help us to clean dirty records. What's there: Database of speeches by George W. Bush (looks like they stopped adding to it in 2004). If you don’t, well, it’ll be your own damn fault if you get into trouble. What's there: Audio recordings of, you guessed it, the World English Bible. @publicdomain4u.com we post a link to a piece of music history you should know about. Also, my brother is a sound engineer. What's there: Large collection of recordings, ranging from “alternative news programming, to Grateful Dead concerts, to Old Time Radio shows, to book and poetry recordings, to original music contributed by users.” (That quote is straight from the site.) The bibliographic record for each work includes its copyright status, so take a look. If by “Classical Music.” you mean historical musical works such as Beethoven, Bach, Mozart, DeBussy, Tchaikovsky, Brahms, etc., it is ALL Public Domain. The collection covers all audio from the 1990 Term through the end of the 2004 Term. That’s why you can’t just take classical music from a CD and use it for anything other than personal listening.